Notes on panel clarity

greatbiglyricstuck:

For a lyricstuck to flow clearly from one panel to another, each image must have a clear composition.

This post will focus on panel flow clarity, so examples will show multiple panels together to hopefully give you ideas of how to coordinate with other artists to make this project great!

Some basics:

Rule of thirds is a very comfortable composition. Best used for lyrics in a stanza.

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This will be all for now. The next stuff I’m going to cover is how to effectively break the flow to achieve an epic effect. Will be finished by Friday when I get class off. :)

~papers

(via paperseverywhere)

palidoozy-art:

As per request (thanks, singingrabbitskull!), I did a half-tutorial, half-sporadic notes on how I generally render basic expressions.

There’s already a lot of cool tutorials that exist on how to do expressions, so I tried to just look at a lot of really minor details that I’ve used but haven’t seen commonly passed down.

required disclaimer: this is just how I go about it, feel free to ignore bits, steal bits, do whatever you want with them. Hope this helps, and if you have any questions scream at my inbox!

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eclipticafusion:

deadtamagotchis:

Chris Sanders’ “Sanders’ Style Surfin’”

Mucho importante

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grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - FeetI don’t often have to draw bare feet, unless I’m doing Life Drawing. When storyboarding, the focus is generally not on the feet. They also are usually covered (shoes, socks), or just not shown on screen that much. Nonetheless, it’s important to understand their functionality and general appeal. Keep details to a minimum, unless the character uses its bare feet to grasp things or do things with them most humans don’t. The best example of pushing feet to an extreme degree of functionality would be Disney’s Tarzan (one of my all time favorite). Other than that, don’t draw too much attention to them, but find appeal in its shapes.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Feet

I don’t often have to draw bare feet, unless I’m doing Life Drawing. When storyboarding, the focus is generally not on the feet. They also are usually covered (shoes, socks), or just not shown on screen that much. Nonetheless, it’s important to understand their functionality and general appeal. Keep details to a minimum, unless the character uses its bare feet to grasp things or do things with them most humans don’t. The best example of pushing feet to an extreme degree of functionality would be Disney’s Tarzan (one of my all time favorite). Other than that, don’t draw too much attention to them, but find appeal in its shapes.

Norm

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ryannorth:

davidmalki:

MAKING A DIY TELEPROMPTER FOR $0.00 USING JUST STUFF I HAVE LYING AROUND AT HOME

A process video? An un-useful tutorial? Only you can decide.

I don’t even need one of these AND YET I FOUND THIS VIDEO FASCINATING

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typette:

eehn:

I did some anatomy. Full view to see my tiny, tiny notes.

it’s always hard for me to remember this so, reblogging for everyone else like me :C

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lexxercise:

I’ve been getting a lot of asks lately about the brushes and textures I use in my work, so here’s a BIG FAT REFERENCE POST for those of you who were curious! Bear in mind that I’m really lazy and don’t know what half the settings do, so don’t be afraid to experiment to figure out what works best for you :>

BRUSHES

Pencil

I use the pencil tool with SAI’s native paper texture both for sketching and for applying opaque color with no blending. Lower opacities give it the feel of different pencil hardnesses, while full opacity makes it more like a palette knife, laying down hard-edged, heavy color for detail work or eventual blending with other brushes.

Ink Pen

Mostly made this because I’m lazy and I didn’t want to have to keep turning my textures off/opacity up when I wanted to ink something (even though I don’t do it very often), or lay down flat colors. I find the line quality to be much more crisp than Photoshop, and you can manually adjust in-program stabilization to help smooth out hand wobbles.

Round Brush

The plain ol’ brush tool acts as sort of an in-between for me in terms of brush flow. It’s heavier than my usual workhorse brush, for faster color application and rough blending, but not as heavy as the pencil tool, which has no blending at all. I like to use the canvas texture on this brush to help break up the unnatural smoothness that usually accompanies digital brushes, but it works just fine without.

Flat Brush

A brush tool set to flat bristle is by far my favorite to paint with. I don’t use any textures with it because I think the shape of the brush provides enough of that by itself. I use it for everything from rough washes to more refined shaping and polish. It’s just GREAT.

Watercolor

Best used for smooth blending, washes, gradients, and smoky atmospheric effects.

Cloud

Basically a grittier version of the watercolor tool, because too much smoothness weird me out. Good for clouds and fog, as the name suggests, or just less boring gradient fills.

TEXTURE OVERLAY

To further stave off the artificially smooth look of digital painting, I almost always overlay some sort of paper texture, and it’s almost always this one, which I scanned and edited myself. You’re all welcome to use it, no permission required!

Using overlays in SAI is just as easy as using them in Photoshop. Just paste the texture into its own layer above everything you want it to apply to, and change the layer mode to Overlay. That’s it!

Want a more prominent texture? Up the contrast. Something more subtle? Lower the contrast or reduce the layer opacity. You can also use a tinted overlay to adjust the overall palette and bring a little more color unity to an otherwise disparate piece! Just be aware that too much texture can hurt the readability of the work beneath it, so I’d err on the side of subtlety.

Hope that helps!

-L

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powercami5000:

Dunno if anyone’s interested in these, but this was my latest assignment for CGMA’s Art of Color and Light class- this past week focused on how light interacts with different materials.
It’d be cool to try some different skin tones, I just used my own pasty hand for reference. Maybe even an alien species with non-red blood, so the occlusion shadow glows a different color where light passes through? Would it be purple for Namekians and green for Vulcans? (ノ◕ヮ◕)ノ*:・゚✧ possibilities
Also, the iridescent pearl wasn’t a requirement, but I enjoy Sailor Moon and suffering. If anyone’s got pointers on iridescence, I am all ears over here, because I clawed my way through that one screaming

powercami5000:

Dunno if anyone’s interested in these, but this was my latest assignment for CGMA’s Art of Color and Light class- this past week focused on how light interacts with different materials.

It’d be cool to try some different skin tones, I just used my own pasty hand for reference. Maybe even an alien species with non-red blood, so the occlusion shadow glows a different color where light passes through? Would it be purple for Namekians and green for Vulcans? (ノ◕ヮ◕)ノ*:・゚✧ possibilities

Also, the iridescent pearl wasn’t a requirement, but I enjoy Sailor Moon and suffering. If anyone’s got pointers on iridescence, I am all ears over here, because I clawed my way through that one screaming

(via punpunichu)

chazzfox:

thatfilthyanimal:

lemonorangelime:

image

If you Ctrl+Click on the little box that shows what is on the layer, it will create a selection the same shape as everything on that layer.  This works in Photoshop, too.

I don’t know how I lived life before knowing this.

[HEAVY BREATHING]

fuck i didn;t know this

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this blog is aimed solely at my personal reference needs, so it may not be all-inclusive in reference subjects.

nsfw content will be featured on this blog so savior the tags of things you do not want to see.


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